Author’s Note on Murder in “Utopia,,

Another Saturday comes and still no new chapters to post for Infinite Limits. Sorry, dear readers. But I do have the print proof now so I can say for sure that next Saturday will mark the return of the Infinite Limits universe to this blog with the first chapter in book two, An Almost Tangent.

In the meantime, I took some time this morning to write an author’s note for my absurd novella Murder in “Utopia,, which you can purchase (or read for free if you have kindle unlimited or Amazon prime) through this link.

Here’s that author’s note to give you a better idea of what’s going on in the novella, and don’t forget to sign up for my email newsletter, with updates on new releases and offers for free books, right through here.

Murder In Utopia Cover JPEG

Author’s Note on Murder in “Utopia,,

For this novella my main goal was to produce a work that was at the same time absurdist and decidedly literary. I think I’ve succeeded in both aspects.

Murder in “Utopia,, was written without the use of quotation marks to distinguish dialogue from narration, much like you would find in a Cormac McCarthy novel. I however, unlike McCarthy who uses the same format for all his works, only wanted to forgo the use of quotation marks if it was for a purpose in the story that went beyond stylistic preferences. With Murder in “Utopia,, I found that purpose.

The story takes place almost entirely inside a priest’s confessional office. Chapters alternate between a psychiatrist giving her confessions to the priest and the confessions of the very patients mentioned by the psychiatrist in her sessions. Every sentence that is written in the past tense is spoken aloud to the priest or by her, and every sentence that is written in the present tense is one of the priest’s thoughts or an action she experiences.

I think you can see now why I found the quotation marks to be unnecessary, even without my having to spoil the plot-based reasoning found in the final chapter of the novella. I think you can also see why Murder in “Utopia,, may be a difficult read the first time through. There are no quotation marks to set off dialogue, the tense of the writing changes based on whether the words are spoken or experienced, and to top it all off, no names are mentioned for any of the characters, each being referred to only by their occupation or the pronouns her, she, etc.

But fear not, dear readers. Continue on despite your confusion. Confusion is part of the experience. And by the end, I think you may realize that you’ve found more clarity than you thought possible in such a jumbled, messy “utopia”.

Thanks for reading along. I hope you enjoy the work and join me for more stories in the future.

We do nothing alone.

-Bryan Perkins 10/24/15

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