Chapter 60: Roo

Hello, dear readers, and welcome back to the Infnite Limits saga. Today we join Roo for her third and final point of view chapter in book three of four, Dividing by Ø. Roo has been given a choice between joining Rosa and Anna in their work, joining the Scientist in hers, or continuing down the independent path Roo has been travelling all her life.

Read on right here to find out what she decides, and if you’d like to finish the entire novel right now, don’t forget to pick up a copy in print or ebook formats through this link. That’s enough talking for today, though, folks. Enjoy your read.

< LIX. Anna     [Table of Contents]     LXI. Chelsea >

LX. Roo

All Roo wanted to do was bend, but life kept getting in the way.

First of all, she would have been happy in her closet—er—secret lair, though it was hard to keep calling it that after she had seen what other benders were working with, but she would have been happy there, bending one path at a time, hacking into the system from the outside, if it weren’t for Anna and the Scientist. Anna had shown Roo the true art of bending. She set the bar for what one person with limited equipment could possibly accomplish by themselves. While the Scientist, on the other hand, had bending down to a science. Instead of the warm creativity of a gut feeling, the Scientist relied on cold hard data fed through intricate algorithms until it was gobbledy-gook that only robots could understand. Both methods offered their unique benefits and drawbacks. Going Anna’s way, Roo could remain the free, independent outsider she had relished being for so long now, while going the Scientist’s way meant she could command control of a wider sweeping stretch of the universe than she ever even knew existed. It was an almost impossible decision to make, made actually impossible for the moment thanks to point number two, which was that, second of all, Roo still had to go to school.

“You can’t be serious,” she complained to her mom when she had finally got home from being with the Scientist. Though she hadn’t agreed to anything yet, Roo still took the system out for a test drive and she didn’t leave the Scientist’s lab until early in the morning. Roo would still be there bending, too, if the Scientist hadn’t forced her to leave and go make her decision. Well how was she supposed to decide anything now with stupid school getting in her way? “It’s just one day, Mom,” Roo begged. “Please. I haven’t taken a sick day in weeks.”

“That’s because you haven’t been sick for weeks,” her mom said, shaking her head. “And you’re not sick now. So, no. You’re going to school and that’s final.” She handed Roo her backpack.

“But, Mom, I—”

No buts. You can make your decision—or play your bending game—or whatever it is you’re so eager to do after class. Now go on. You don’t want to be late.”

“But—”

Go.”

Roo heaved a big sigh as she grabbed her bag and strapped it on her back. “Fine,” she said. “Whatever.” And she stomped out of the house, towards her secret lair rather than towards school despite her mom’s demands. Roo never should have asked for the day off in the first place. It was always easier to ask for forgiveness than it was to ask for permission, anyway.

She was walking by instinct, giving no thought to the path she had traveled so many times before, trying to find some way to decide between the art and the science of bending, when she ran into Mike—literally—and tumbled to the ground in a heap with him.

“Oh—uh—I’m sorry,” he said, standing to help her up. “Oh, Roo! It’s you. Just the jumpie I was looking for.”

“I’m not a jumpie,” Roo groaned, wiping the dirt off her pants.

“Yeah, yeah, whatever.” Mike rolled his eyes. “But I just had to find you, okay. You’re never gonna believe what happened after you left.”

Roo scoffed. “I wouldn’t really call what happened to me leaving. It was more like I was kidnapped.”

“Oh, yeah,” Mike said. “I guess you can call it that. Where’d you end up going anyway?

Roo gritted her teeth. She kind of wanted to punch this annoying kid in the face. He was just another in a long line of distractions that were trying to prevent her from deciding her future. “Do you really care?” she asked.

“What? Yeah, of course I do.” Mike almost looked offended. “You’re my friend. Especially after you—well—at least you tried to help me find my mom.”

“Tried? What do you mean tried? We did find her. Anna said—”

Mike shook his head. Roo was afraid he was going to cry for a second—she had no idea how to comfort sad people and didn’t have time to learn—but he quickly snapped out of it and half smiled. “No, well, Anna was protecting us. Her and my mom both were. And, technically, you did help me find her, though there was no her left to be found.”

Roo held her hand to her mouth. “You mean…” she said.

Mike nodded. He made a motion like a knife slitting his throat so he didn’t have to say the words, and Roo wasn’t sure which would have been worse. She noticed her jaw was open—and probably had been for some time—then forced it closed only to fail at opening it again to spit out words.

“You don’t have to say anything,” Mike said after Roo had tried to talk and failed at it for long enough to be embarrassed. “You know, it’s kind of for the better, actually. I know, I know, it would obviously be better if she weren’t dead, but at least I know who she really was now.”

“Who was she?” Roo asked, happy her vocal chords were able to sound at least three short words.

Not a jumpie,” Mike said, stomping a foot as if he were crushing the idea of it like a bug. “She wasn’t addicted to anything. She was protecting us. You saw what those people were capable of.”

“What who was capable of?”

“Oh, well, you know. The people who took you or whatever, for starters. And the one’s who killed my mom, right? Especially them.”

“But who killed your mom, Mike?” Roo was getting worried. Mike’s ideas didn’t seem to connect. It was like he was reciting taught information that he didn’t quite understand yet. “I never saw them.”

“Well, no. Me neither.” He shook his head, looking more confused than ever. “But Anna did. She told me it was the protectors, or whatever. That’s who Mom was protecting us from.”

Of course. Anna and the Human Family were behind this. No wonder it was like arguing with a student instead of a master. “The protectors?” Roo asked. “That’s why your mother left you all those times? To protect you from the protectors?”

Mike nodded emphatically, like he was trying to convince himself, too. “That’s right. She was fighting to keep us safe. All of us humans. You, too.”

Right.” Roo nodded, not really believing the kid’s story but not wanting to burst his bubble about his dead mom either. “So who’s supposed to take care of your brothers now? Just you?”

“No.” Mike scoffed. “Ugh. I couldn’t handle that. As a matter of fact, for the first time ever, I won’t have to. I’m free, Roo. I’m finally free to live my own life.”

“But who if not you?” Roo asked, dreading the answer.

The Family. That’s who. That’s what I’ve been trying to tell you. Anna and Rosa said I—said we could come live with them. Isn’t that awesome?”

“You’re going to live with Anna?”

“And Rosa.” Mike nodded. “She’s not supposed to be that cranky all the time, by the way.”

“And all because they told you that your mom was working with them? Because they told you that she was fighting to protect their Human Family, or whatever.”

Exactly,” Mike said, smiling. “So now the Human Family is going to take care of us. Isn’t it great?”

“And the Scientist already knew about Anna and her capabilities a long time ago. She wasn’t afraid at all, otherwise she would have done something about them.”

“The what? What are you talking about now?”

“There has to be some connection between the two, some reason the Scientist continues to let Anna’s transport system exist. Some thing is holding those two together, and I’m going to figure out what it is.”

“What are you talking about? I don’t understand.”

“You said they were letting you live at their house, right? Or the Home, or whatever. Did they give you a room yet?”

“Oh my God, yes. You wouldn’t believe it. I get my own bed, okay, my own desk, my own toy box. I don’t have to share any of it. It’s insane.”

“You know, I’d really like to see it,” Roo said, grabbing him by the collar and pulling him toward the Family Home. “How about we skip class and go take a tour instead?”

“I—but—” Mike complained, pretending to fight but not really trying to stop her from taking him wherever she wanted to go—no one ever really wanted to go to school. “What if the teacher get’s mad at…”

The Family Home was a few blocks away. They made quick time of it as soon as Mike stopped pretending to want to go to class and carried his own weight. When they got to the block the building was on Roo pulled Mike into the shadow of an alley.

“So you have your keys, right?” she asked him.

“Oh, it’s never locked.” Mike chuckled. “The doors to the Family Home are always open to any human in need,” he recited as if he were mocking someone’s voice—probably Rosa’s or Anna’s.

“So is anyone gonna be there?” Roo asked.

“Yeah, prolly. I don’t know.” He shrugged. “What’s it matter, anyway? I live here now.”

“But Anna, is she going to be there?”

I don’t know. Why do you care? We’re just going to see my room. I’m allowed to have friends over.”

“Alright, alright,” Rosa said, turning him around to face the house and patting him on the back to calm him. “Settle down now, cowboy. I was just asking. Let’s go see it already.”

“Wait,” Mike said, stopping and turning back around to her. “I’m not as stupid as you think I am, you know. Just because I don’t know about the fourth dimension—or whatever—and just because I don’t know about jumping and all that doesn’t mean I was born yesterday. You got that?”

“Woah, now,” Roo said, waving her hands in mock defense. “I don’t think you’re stupid.”

Mike scoffed. “You sure treat me like it.”

Roo felt a little ashamed. He was right about that, but she wasn’t ready to admit it. It wasn’t that she thought he was stupid, per se, just that he wasn’t as smart as she was. No one was. So if she thought he was stupid, she thought everyone everywhere was stupid, and Mike really had no reason to complain anyway because he wasn’t unique in that aspect. “I don’t think you’re stupid,” she repeated trying to placate him. “I’m sorry if I made you feel that way. So, please, can we go see your room now?”

“Then prove it,” Mike said, crossing his arms. “Tell me what you really want to do here. I know you’re not interested in seeing my bedroom.”

“I—well…” There was no hiding it now. She would just have to convince him to go along with her plan—or at the very least not to spoil it. “I did have a little something else in mind. Yes.” She nodded.

“Well…” Mike tapped his feet.

“Well, I just wanted to get another look at Anna’s transport system, you know,” Roo said, unable to think of a lie even if she wanted to tell one. “Her consoles are more intricate than anything I’ve ever seen, and I thought I might find some inspiration for the design of my own secret lair.”

Mike scoffed. “Your janitor’s closet?” he said. “You’ll never be able to—”

Roo slapped him on the arm. “My secret lair needs work, I know, but that’s why I want to look at Anna’s. She’s bending the walls without even being tapped directly into them, and I want to know how she does it. It’s almost like she’s creating her own walls right there in her basement.”

Mike scoffed, shaking his head. “That’s just a bunch of jumpie jargon,” he said. “It means nothing to me. You know, maybe I shouldn’t let you in after all. I don’t want to ruin a good thing for myself on the first day of living here. C’mon. Let’s go back to class.” He took a few steps in that direction but stopped when he saw that Roo wasn’t following.

“Never call me a jumpie again,” she said. “I’m a bender.”

Fine,” Mike said. “Then it was bender jargon. There’s no difference. You’re addicted, and I’m not going to enable you. Now c’mon. We’re already late for class.”

“I’m not your mother,” Roo said.

Mike scoffed. “Leave her out of this. She wasn’t a jumpie. Anna told me the truth about her.”

“Lies. Anna told you lies and she’s gonna keep telling them to you to keep you in her stupid family. It’s a trap, Mike, and now’s the time to get out while you still can.”

“You’re wrong.” Mike looked like he was going to cry again. Roo felt a little bad that she had to talk about his late mother like that, but it was too late for pity. Pity would only put him in further danger. “My mom believed in the Family, too,” he said. “She gave her life for it.”

“She gave her life for Anna’s benefit and the benefit of her cranky partner. No one else. Not you, not your brothers, not some mythological Family which doesn’t even exist. She was trapped just like you are, and if you don’t get out now, you’ll end up dead just like your mom.”

“Fuck you, jumpie!” Mike was crying now, and spitting while he screamed, “I never should have come to you for help in the first place. You’re toxic! You can find your own fucking way in. I’m leaving.” He stomped away toward school, whether he was going there or not.

Roo stood in the alley, shaking her head in silence. She hated to piss Mike off like that—on some level—but he needed to see the truth despite his denials of its verifiability. Hopefully he’d wake up to it before the trap was sprung—that is if it hadn’t been sprung already.

She turned to face the family home, that central hub of evil with its tendrils emanating through all four dimensions. Her mission would be more difficult without the bedroom tour as cover, but if anyone questioned her as to why she was there, she could just say that she was looking for Mike, was he home? She watched the door from her alley corner for some time—no one entering or leaving—before she cautiously slunk over and extended a trembling hand to the door knob.

She took a deep breath, opened the door to an empty entryway, and blew all the air out of her lungs in a too loud huff. Grinning at her luck, she made her way to the basement door and pulled it open to reveal stairs she didn’t recognize. Climbing down them she found stacks of supplies rather than the transporter system she was sure was there before.

Ugh.” She groaned as she climbed back up the stairs. This had to be the place. She knew it was. She closed the door and scanned the still empty—thank God—halls but her reconnaissance only proved to her that she had gone in the right door. She opened it again and ran down to groan at the empty supply room before running back upstairs and slamming the door closed behind her.

She huffed, leaning her back on the stupid door. What did this all mean? This was the door, the transport system was supposed to be down there, what was she to do now?

The door tried to open behind her, but by reflex, she braced against it, shutting it tight. She only had a split second to decide what to do next and ended up diving into an office instead of the kitchen. The door swung open again and out came Anna and her cranky partner who was complaining loudly.

“I can’t believe that stupid door got stuck again. I can’t take it anymore.”

“It was probably just someone going to the supply closet,” Anna said, her voice moving toward the kitchen—thank God. “You can’t have two doors in the same place like that at not expect to get some crossover.”

“Yeah, whatever,” her cranky partner said as Roo dove into the basement door they had just come out of right before it closed.

The stairs were different now. They were the stairs Roo recognized. She climbed down them to find the two consoles and six transporter rings she had been looking for. It was now or never.

She only booted up one of the consoles. Two would be too many to control and more to shut off if someone found her out. She got distracted playing with the thing for a while before she remembered where she was and what she was there for, then she started searching through the console’s recent history.

A lot of it was random. Another lot of it directed at the protector’s world where the Family must have been doing some type of thing. Then there was the anomaly. It was a place that had been searched often but never visited. It seemed more like it was being surveilled. Roo zoomed in on that spot and there weren’t a lot of paths in or out, maybe two or three: printing, disposal, and a single entrance—a single entrance for now.

Roo’s hands flew over the console’s touchscreen, levers, and keys. The universe unravelled before her. A path opened up and she put it into place. Soon the transport ring was humming and she knew someone would hear the sound, but whoever it was would be too late. The secret was found out. She stepped through the door just as it fwipped closed behind her, silencing the voices that were calling for her to stop as they ran down into the family’s basement.

She was in a giant office now. The carpet was red and soft, and there were paintings of big fat people dressed up in black and white costumes all over the walls. Behind a gargantuan desk sat a flabby fat man who was wearing the same costume as the people in the paintings. At Roo’s appearance, he coughed and choked on something from the huge pile of food he was eating in front of him. It reminded Roo of the scene she had seen from above when lines of similarly clothed fatties ate from similarly giant piles of food. She was disgusted and wanted leave already, but she stood her ground despite that.

“Who—Ho ho—” The big fat man in black and white said through his coughing. “Who are you? Wh—What are you doing here?”

“Who are you?” Roo demanded, walking straight up to his desk, which was too high so she had to push a chair close to it and jump up to be seen.

“I am Lord Walker, master of everything you see and have ever seen,” he said, sweeping his hands in a grand gesture over the vast desk. “I demand to know who intrudes on my private time.”

“How do you know Anna?” Roo asked, ignoring his demands.

“The Sixer? She’s Rosa’s partner. I’d be rid of your Anna if I could, though.”

Roo nodded. “So you do know them, then.”

Enough.” Lord Walker slammed a fat fist on the desk and the sound of it rang in Roo’s ears. “Who are you? I demand to know.”

“And the Scientist? You know her, too. Don’t you?” Roo went on.

The fat man scoffed. “That’s about enough,” he said. “Haley! Come get this child out of here. How did it even get in here in the first place?”

Wait.” Roo had to think fast. “Wait, wait. I’m just kidding, okay. I—”

“Who are you?” the fat man demanded. “Stop toying with me. Are you—ooooohhh—of course, you’re the director I’ve been talking to. Is that it? Aronostly is it? I didn’t expect anyone so… So…”

“Stop right there,” Roo said, about to pee herself she was so nervous but continuing her show of confidence nonetheless. “Just tell me, why are you working with Anna?”

“That’s exactly what I asked you here for, old boy. I’m working on a movie with her. She’s hired a director, but he’s not living up to my standards. I need someone with more vision. Someone like you. I’ve got a big project for you, now. Bigger than anything you’ve ever worked on. What do you say?”

Roo didn’t have anything to say. She didn’t really know what she had gotten herself into or how she was supposed to get out of it.

A door opened somewhere behind her. In walked a woman who was wearing black and white, too, but her costume was a short, lacy skirt with no top hat. She strutted up to the side of the desk, between Roo and Lord Walker, and curtsied. “Yes, Lord,” she said in a quiet voice.

“Why didn’t you tell me our guest had arrived?” he chided her. “We need refreshments, dear. I’ll take an old-fashioned and our guest will have…”

“Guest, sir?” the woman looked confusedly at Roo.

“What would you like?” the fat man asked her. “Any drink you can think of, we have it.”

“Oh—uh…” What was she supposed to say? “I’ll have a milk, please.”

“Milk?” the fat man said, a strange look on his face. Roo’s body wanted to run away at the sight of it, but before it could, the fat man started laughing. “Ho ho ho. You heard the man. Milk it is. A real old fashioned drink, that one. Ho ho ho!”

“Yes, sir.” The woman curtsied and left through the only door in the room.

“So,” the fat man said. “Your milk’s coming. Ho ho ho. And you’ve heard my offer. Now tell me, what do you think?”

“I, uh— Well, sir… I’m still not entirely sure what it is you’re offering,” Roo stalled.

“A job, my boy. Ho ho ho! You’re not truly so dense are you? No, of course not. I’ve seen your body of work. I know better. You’re just pulling my leg, aren’t you? This is an act. Ho ho ho. Good one, my boy. You Threes never quit entertaining, do you?”

Roo groaned, hoping the gesture wasn’t audible, but what was this fatso going on about? Directors and movies had nothing to do with Anna and her transport system for as far as Roo could tell, while this Lord Walker, whoever he was, kept going on about some sort of job. He thought that Roo was someone else, someone who could probably still walk into the office at any minute and blow her cover, so she’d have to get what little information she could out of the fat man as fast as she could then get out of there soon after—if she could even find an escape when the time came.

The door opened behind her and Roo almost jumped out of her seat at the sound of it. Luckily it wasn’t the director she was impersonating but the servant woman in the short skirt with their drinks. She set a brownish liquid in front of Lord Walker and a tall glass of milk in front of Roo.

“Is that all, sir?” she asked with a curtsy.

Lord Walker downed his drink in one loud gulp. “I’ll have another of these,” he said, slamming the empty glass on the desk with a loud clang. “What about you, old boy? Do you need anything else?”

Roo shook her head. She didn’t even want the milk she already had, but she took a sip of it anyway so she didn’t have to speak.

“Then just the old fashioned, dear. Move along.” He waved the woman out of the room and she left with a curtsy.

“What do you think of that one, eh?” Lord Walker asked, winking at Roo and pointing at the door the woman had just left through. “Legs that go on for miles, if you know what I mean. Ho ho ho!”

Roo nodded and laughed even though she had no idea what he meant.

“Yeah, I know you do, old boy,” Lord Walker said in a conspiratorial tone. “I saw you oogling her.”

Roo blushed. “I—”

Ho ho ho!” Lord Walker slammed a fat fist on the desk. “No need to worry, my boy. You’ve done nothing wrong. I won’t chastise you. She’s nothing more than an object, after all—another one of my possessions. She’s meant to be looked at, designed to like it even. She likes you looking at her, boy, and I do, too, so go right ahead and do it. Ho ho ho!”

Roo nodded and smiled. She had met boys who thought the same about girls before, but never one who thought that she was a boy, too, and as such, revealed to her what was truly on his mind. No matter how much she disagreed with it, though, she had to play along or blow her cover. She needed to get out of there sooner than ever.

Oh ho ho!” Lord Walker went on. “I know, my boy. It leaves you speechless, doesn’t it? All that concentrated beauty in one single package, and all at my beck and call. I snap my fingers and she’s there. My stomach grumbles and she’s already making me breakfast. Time to take my pants off and she’s by my side.” He winked and Roo almost choked on the milk she was sipping. “Oh you ol’ sport.” Lord Walker grinned. “You heard that right. She’s next to my bed, under it, or in it, however I require. Ho ho ho!”

The conversation had already gone too far and Lord Walker just kept taking it further. Roo had to say something to put an end to it, but what?

Uh—Right, sir—er—Lord.” Roo smiled, trying her hardest not to look as disgusted as she felt. “But I’m not sure what this has to do with me or the job you’re offering.”

Ho ho ho,” Lord Walker chuckled. “Don’t play sly with me now. You know good and well what I’m getting at. I’m sure you have fantasies of your own, the perfect woman lifted from the best attributes of characters in the movies you’ve made. Well, my boy, it’s not just a fantasy anymore. I can make all your dreams come true, no matter how depraved they might be.” Lord Walker grinned and winked his monocled eye.

Roo couldn’t take it anymore. She wanted to gag, or to spit out some insult and run away, but she choked down both urges. “And if my fantasies can’t be fulfilled with a woman?” she asked. “What then?”

Ho ho ho! Really, my boy? I know things are different in Three, but I never took you for the type. And yes, we have men, too, if that better suits your desire. Ho ho ho.”

No,” Roo snapped. “I mean, no, sir—uh—Lord, sir,” she went on more calmly. “What if no slave at all could fulfill my desires, man or woman?”

“I take offense to that term, slave,” Lord Walker huffed. “She’s no more a slave to me than your camera is to you, or the elevator you rode in on is to anyone else. She’s a robot, not a human. She can’t be a slave.”

A robot? That was impossible. Something so lifelike couldn’t be anything but human. Lord Walker was just making excuses for his abhorrent behavior. He was a sexist pig—almost literally a pig at his size—of a slave master, and Roo had seen enough. As if on cue, the woman—who was clearly a human after looking at her again—came back in and put another drink in front of Lord Walker with a curtsy.

“There you are, sir,” she said with a smile—a human smile. “Can I get you anything else?”

“No, sweetheart. Not right now,” Lord Walker said, shooing her away. “We’re trying to have a conversation here. Be gone.”

“Actually, sir,” Roo said before the woman could curtsy and leave. “It’s a little embarrassing, but I could really use the bathroom right now.” She did a little dance in her seat like she really had to go.

Lord Walker looked shocked for a moment, like Roo had started speaking a foreign language all of a sudden. “The bathroo— Oh. Of course. Ho ho ho.” He slammed his ham fist on the desk with his bellowing laughter. “The restroom. I thought you meant to take a bath. I wasn’t going to say anything about your stench, but I didn’t think you needed to go so far as request a bath mid meeting. Ho ho ho!”

“Yes, well…” Roo said, still dancing and actually getting an urge to pee as she pretended to have one. “Do you mind?”

Oh ho ho! Of course not, sport. Forgive me. With these pants I never think twice about it, you know. Ho ho ho. You heard the man, Haley, dear. Show him to the restroom, please. Ho ho ho!”

“Sir, yes, sir.” Haley curtsied and turned to Roo. “Follow me, please, sir.”

Roo scooped up her backpack and followed Haley out of the door and into a long hall. Roo kept going toward the metal doors at the other end of the hall, but after after Haley had closed the wooden door they had just left, she called Roo back. “This way, please, sir.”

“Oh,” Roo said, crossing back. “I’m sorry, I thought—”

“Yes, sir. We only use the one door here, though. So if you’ll please.” She opened the door and instead of the office there was the biggest bathroom Roo had ever seen, with too many toilets and just as many gold plated sinks. “I’ll be out here to escort you back to the office when you’re done.”

“Oh—uh, thanks,” Roo said, stepping into the bathroom as Haley closed the door behind her.

Roo dropped her bag on the ceramic tile and rushed over to vomit in the toilet. She didn’t know if it was all the adrenaline from almost being caught or the disgusting combination of Lord Walker’s sloppy face and creepy words, but she had to get everything inside of her out. After she had eradicated it all from her body—including her mouth by washing it with water from the faucet a few times—she sat on the toilet to take the pee she had faked needing and figure a way out of this Hell hole.

She could just try to finish the meeting then leave like she was always supposed to be there, but that came with plenty of risks. First, she’d have to sit through more conversation with the disgusting Lord Walker. Second, the person who she was impersonating could walk in at any minute—then she’d really be screwed. And third, when she did get to leave, there would be no telling where they would send her. Three, by the sound of it, almost certainly wasn’t the world she wanted to go to, her world, home. So that was pretty much out of the question.

What else was there, though? She could burst out of the door and make a break for it. But that Haley would be outside waiting, and even if Roo could get past her, she wouldn’t know how to use the crazy doors they have which obviously relied on some advanced automatic remote bending system of some kind that Roo had never seen the likes of—except maybe at the Scientist’s lab.

Which brought her back to the real crux of the situation, back to the problem that was eating at her mind even more than her need to escape the rat trap she was caught in, the fact that her future, her entire universe even, was being controlled by three old fogies she had never met before in her life. Anna had her transport system, capable of forming new walls in remote locations and run by the most competent bender Roo had ever witnessed, Anna herself. Lord Walker here had his magic doors and elevators, and no doubt countless other secret control systems hidden away in his labyrinth of pompous, fat, sexist slave mongering. And the Scientist had the most technologically advanced four dimensional bending system possible with the current standards of technology. All three of them were stuck in their old fashioned ways, all three had too much control over Roo’s universe, and all three lacked one vital attribute which alone could save them from collapsing in on themselves: foresight.

Roo finished, flushed, and washed her hands then set to pulling her handheld transporter console out of her backpack. The bathroom door had to be connected to the walls, it was the only way it could work the way it did, opening onto different rooms like that. She looked around for something hard, found a plunger under the sink, and used the wooden end to bust open the drywall next to the door jamb. She worried at first about the noise but gave in and smashed without reserve. Hopefully Haley was worlds away, not just on the other side of the drywall.

Behind the filthy white wall she found exactly what she needed, a mash of multicolored wires almost teeming with electricity. She ripped one out, careful not to shock herself—not that she hadn’t felt that pain a million times before already—and jacked her portable console in. In the next second it was on and she fell deep into the fourth dimension. Every one of them were going to come face to face and admit what they had done, admit what they had colluded to keep alive, Anna, Lord Walker, the Scientist, and anyone else who stood in Roo’s way. It was time for them all to see that their grip on the universe was slipping and the era of a new generation of bender was dawning.

 

#     #     #

< LIX. Anna     [Table of Contents]     LXI. Chelsea >

And there it is, dear readers. Another chapter in the Infinite Limits saga. Only three more to go in Dividing by Ø and then it’ll soon be time for the fourth and final book in the series. I hope you’re as excited to read the finale as I am to share it. Either way, have a great weekend, and please do think about picking up a copy of or leaving a review for any book in the series right through this link. We do nothing alone.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s