0.N Repeating Progress and Some Daily Sketches

Hello, dear readers. I know it’s been more than a month since I last posted anything to this blog, but that’s because I’ve been hard at work finishing the first draft of the computer game script I’m working on, writing a query letter for a novel I’ve been editing (The Vanguard), and yes, finally getting around to editing the fourth and final novel in the Infinite Limits series 0.N Repeating.

Currently, 0.N Repeating is the project I’m mainly focused on, and I hope to have it publishable within two or so months. As soon as it’s been edited, formatted, and published, expect me to return to my usual schedule of posting one new chapter a week, on every Saturday, until we’ve reached the conclusion of Infinite Limits.

In the meantime, I’ve also been participating in a daily sketch challenge, and if you have any interest in seeing what that’s like, you can find all my drawings on my new Instagram page here. Here are a few samples of what I’ve been drawing (and digitally coloring) so far:

 

So don’t forget to follow me on Instagram if you want to see more, and don’t stop following me here for updates on the soon to be released fourth and final book of the Infinite Limits Series, 0.N Repeating.

We do nothing alone.

Advertisements

Interview With SF-Books

The other day I did a short interview with the website SF-Books.com and I thought I’d share it here, too, so as many people as possible could read it. They sent me a list of questions and I ended up writing up a short five hundred word response. Here are both.

Here’s a brief list of questions:

What is your latest book? What is it about? What writers do you enjoy or influence your work? What did you do before you took up writing? Did you read much scifi/fantasy as a kid? What are you working on next?

Thanks, Simon

And my response, which you can find on the SF-Books website here:

My name’s Bryan “with a Y” Perkins and I make the money I need to survive in our capitalist society by doing independently contracted quality assurance work for search engines. That’s a fancy way to say that I’m a glorified survey taker who teaches AIs how to do his job for him. I didn’t go to school thinking I’d be a robot teacher, though. I attended LSU in Baton Rouge and got a degree in Biology but never really felt like starting a career in the field. Instead I worked through odd jobs in video game testing, freelance writing, and freelance editing while I became heavily involved in Occupy Baton Rouge. To this day I still do what I can to end the reign of profits over human needs–mostly writing revolutionary fiction–but now I do it from my new home in New Orleans, Louisiana.

My latest book, An Almost Tangent, is book two in the four part epic dystopian science fiction series Inifinite Limits. It continues the story of the worlds of Outland in which 3D printers provide every luxury humans could desire, from food to clothing, entertainment, and beyond, androids perform what little labor is left necessary in the resulting boon, and elevators travel anywhere anyone might want to go, whether it be upstairs, across the country, or to another world. Things might sound idyllic in Outland, but from Ansel’s point of view they look a little different.

As for my influences, I certainly have to name Margaret Atwood for helping me realize that long, beautiful sentences do belong in science fiction–if I can ever figure out how to write them myself. And of course Ursula K. Le Guin, not only for her writing but for her subject matter and fearless politics. Le Guin is never afraid to call out the established order of things and demand something new and better. Third I’ll say Kurt Vonnegut, someone who I read almost religiously in high school and who I only wish I was as funny as. And last but not least, Albert Camus for his absurdism. Without The Stranger, which I discovered in high school, or The Plague, which came to me later in life, I might not be the absurdist writer I am today.

I have several irons in the fire right now. I’m producing an audio book for my novella Murder in “Utopia,, which is currently only available in digital format right here. That should be out sometime in late March or early May. I also have book three of the Infinite Limits series, Dividing by Zero, sitting on my hard drive waiting to be edited and published, which I should get to after finishing the first draft of the novel I’m currently writing, The Vanguard, in the next month or so. And besides that I’m shopping around a shorter speculative fiction novel, called Executioner(s), for traditional publishing and editing another to start sending queries out for. It seems like so much more when I write it all out like that, and I’m starting to think that maybe I should go get to work on it now…

So there it is, dear readers. Subscribe to my email newsletter, delivered rarely, if you want to keep up to date as all those new releases start trickling out, and have a wonderful Thursday.

Octavia E. Butler’s Reasons for Becoming an Author and 10 Quotes About Writing

You can find the source of today’s writing advice post right here. One thing to note before going on is that I’m not posting these to the blog here in the same order as I did to reddit, so you may see references to posts I haven’t made yet. Those links will just take you to an /r/writing self post and a glimpse of the future of this blog. No worries.

Anyway, here it is, Octavia Butler’s advice about writing:

Today I’d like to move to another of my favorite writers, Octavia E. Butler. As you might be able to tell by some of the other authors I’ve been choosing (Atwood , Le Guin , etc.), I’m a little biased toward speculative fiction, and in this video (which I found on Feministing here), Butler accurately explains a major reason why by explaining why she enjoys writing science fiction. To quote the linked video:

It’s a wonderful way to think about possibilities. It’s a wonderful way to explore exotic politics. It’s a wonderful–it’s a freedom. It’s a way of doing anything you want. There are all sorts of walls around other genres. Romances, mysteries, westerns. There are no real walls around science fiction. We can build them, but they’re not there naturally.

And if that wasn’t a good enough reason for you, you can check out this video snippet of a panel discussion filmed at UCLA in 2002 in which she discusses, among other things, how a bad movie encouraged her to get into science fiction.

Bringing us to her ten “tips” for writing, which in this case comes from the Aerogramme Writer’s Studio website where they’ve collected some inspiring Butler Quotes for us. Here are, I think, the more useful ones for writers:

  1. On Habit : “First forget inspiration. Habit is more dependable. Habit will sustain you whether you’re inspired or not. Habit will help you finish and polish your stories. Inspiration won’t. Habit is persistence in practice.”
  2. On Science Fiction: “I was attracted to science fiction because it was so wide open. I was able to do anything and there were no walls to hem you in and there was no human condition that you were stopped from examining.”
  3. On College: “I’ve talked to high school kids who are thinking about trying to become a writer and asking ‘What should I major in?’, and I tell them, ‘History. Anthropology. Something where you get to know the human species a little better, as opposed to something where you learn to arrange words.’ I don’t know whether that’s good advice or not, but it feels right to me.”
  4. On Persistence: “You don’t start out writing good stuff. You start out writing crap and thinking it’s good stuff, and then gradually you get better at it. That’s why I say one of the most valuable traits is persistence.”
  5. On Writers’ Workshops: “A workshop is a way of renting an audience, and making sure you’re communicating what you think you’re communicating. It’s so easy as a young writer to think you’re been very clear when in fact you haven’t.”
  6. On Being a Writer: “Writing is one of the few professions in which you can psychoanalyse yourself, get rid of hostilities and frustrations in public, and get paid for it.”
  7. On Writing Everyday: “And I have this little litany of things they can do. And the first one, of course, is to write – every day, no excuses. It’s so easy to make excuses. Even professional writers have days when they’d rather clean the toilet than do the writing.”
  8. On Personal Experience: “I think writers use absolutely everything that happens to us, and surely if I had had a different sort of childhood and still come out a writer, I’d be a different kind of writer. It’s on a par with, but different from, the fact that I had four brothers who were born and died before I was born. Some of them didn’t come to term, some of them did come to term and then died. But my mother couldn’t carry a child to term, for the most part something went wrong. If they had lived, I would be a very different person. So, anything that happens in your life that is important, if it didn’t happen you would be someone different.”
  9. On Research: “I talked to members of my family, and did some personal research that didn’t really have anything to do with the time and place I was writing about, but that gave me a feeling of the experience of being black in a time and place where it was very difficult to be black.”
  10. On Theory: “I avoid all critical theory because I worry about it feeding into my work. I mean, I don’t worry about nonfiction in general feeding in—in fact, I hope it will—but I worry about criticism influencing me because it can create a vicious circle or something worse. It’s just an impression of mine, but in some cases critics and authors seem to be massaging each other. It’s not very good for storytelling.”

There are a couple more quotes in there if you’re into Butler as much as I am, but I’m pretty sure these ones contain the only writing tips.

And in case you don’t try to avoid it, like Butler does, and want more theory, here’s a PDF by a couple of English professors in which they analyze and critically study the style and techniques of select Butler works. Enjoy until next time.

[Click here for more writing advice for beginners.]

China Miéville on Novel Structure for Beginners

I spend a lot of time on reddit while I’m doing the work that pays my bills (not writing yet, I’m afraid), and recently I’ve been posting the writing tips that helped get me started to the /r/writing subreddit. Starting today, and every Thursday until I run out of them, I’m going to share those writing tips here on the blog, as well.

You might recognize this first one from my personal note about The Asymptote’s Tail. I’m just going to go ahead and quote the self post directly from reddit, but you can find it here if you want to see the conversation it produced there. I hope it helps:

This was posted here more than a year ago by /u/toothsoup, but it helped me so much, I thought it deserved rehashing for anyone who hasn’t seen it yet. What follows is all from the linked post above:

I finally got around to transcribing an interview that Miéville gave at a writer’s festival earlier this year where he was talking about his new book (Railsea), writing comics, and his place in the fantastic genre. He also took questions from the crowd, and I found his answer to a rather broad question about structure really solid. It’s helped me out in how I’m thinking about structuring my first novel, so I thought I’d post it here in case it helps someone else.


I was wondering if you could give me some advice on how to deal with structure? How do you deal with it?

“You’re talking about writing a novel, right? I think it’s kind of like…do you know Kurt Schwitters, the artist? He was an experimental artist in the 1940s who made these very strange cut up collages and so on and very strange abstract paintings. And I was just seeing an exhibition of his, and one of the things that is really noticeable is he is known for these wild collages, and then interspersing these are these really beautiful, very formally traditional oil paintings, portraits, and landscapes and so on.And this is that old—I mean it’s a bit of a cliché–but the old thing about knowing the rules and being able to obey them before you can break them. Now I think that that is quite useful in terms of structure for novels because one of the things that stops people writing is kind of this panic at the scale of the thing, you know? So I would say, I would encourage anyone that’s writing a novel to be as out there as they possibly can. But as a way of getting yourself kick-started, why not go completely traditional?

Think three-act structure, you know. Think rising action at the beginning of the journey and then some sort of cliff-hanger at the end of act one. Continuing up to the end of act two, followed by a big crisis at the end of act three, followed by a little dénouement. Think 30,000 words, 40,000 words, 30,000 words, so what’s that, around 100,000 words. Divide that up into 5,000 word chapters so you’re going 6/8/6. I realise this sounds incredibly sort of drab, and kind of mechanical. But my feeling is that the more you can kind of formalise and bureaucratise those aspects of things. It actually paradoxically liberates you creatively because you don’t need to worry about that stuff.

If you front load that stuff, plant all that out in advance and you know the rough outline of each chapter in advance, then when you come to each day’s writing, you’re able to go off in all kinds of directions because you know what you have to do in that day. You have to walk this character from this point to this point and you can do that in the strangest way possible. Whereas if you’re looking at a blank piece of paper and saying where do you I go from here you get kind of frozen.

The unwritten novel has a basilisk’s stare, and so I would say do it behind your own back by just formally structuring it in that traditional way. And then when you have confidence and you’ve gained confidence in that, you can play more odder games with it. But it’s really not a bad way to get started.”

[Click here for more writing advice for beginners.]